Handling Scheduling When We Are All VERY Busy :)

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Almost nobody likes a deadline, but sometimes, deadlines are the only way something gets done. In pondering the subject of this blog entry, I decided to use an example from my own studio – and hope the strategies and thought-processes I have used will be helpful to you.  I would be interested in hearing your… Read more »

Is There Such a Thing as Too Many Referrals?

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Yesterday during a break between lessons, I checked my voicemail to find three messages from parents seeking a voice teacher for their children.  Three inquiries in a week? Completely normal.  But three in the span of two hours? I got my explanation when a teacher from another local studio called and revealed himself as the… Read more »

The Courage to Charge What You’re Worth

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In 2009 I had the pleasure of hearing Beth Gigante Klingenstein, author of The Independent Piano Teacher’s Studio Handbook, speak on the question of “Who’s in Charge of Your Studio?” at the University of St. Thomas Summer Music Institute. The main message I took away from her workshop was that if we as studio owners… Read more »

Maintaining Income During the Summer

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I own and operate a small piano studio out of my home, and the summertime is always a bit of a financial struggle for me. When I took piano lessons growing up, we always continued our lessons during the summer.  They were a bit more sporadic, since my teacher usually took a vacation and my… Read more »

Size Matters!

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Although your studio may be based on furthering artistic pursuits, a studio is a business, and a good part of its success depends on being realistic about this.  I taught and helped manage one music school where the board of directors hired an orchestra conductor with fundraising expertise as the school’s director.  Unfortunately, she’d had… Read more »

Whose Side Are You On?

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How does your studio stack up against the schools around you?  Do you try to match up with schools,  or to contrast with them?   A studio is a kind of school, so it’s natural to make the comparison. While many studios probably don’t make a deliberate decision about it, some feel they are taken… Read more »

Grow Your Studio, part 3 — In Touch with Teachers

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Grow your studio by building a team — keep in touch with your teachers!  Teachers are the heart of your studio; you want them engaged and happy.  After all, they are the ones who bring their energy to the students. You may be a teacher yourself, but in your role as studio manager, you are… Read more »

How do we connect with our clients more efficiently?

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Lately I have become obsessed with social media and how I can use it to better and more efficiently communicate with my clients. In my case, I run a music school in Brooklyn, NY (www.BrooklynMusicFactory.com) and so I am in regular communication with about 60 registered students and parents. Let’s review briefly the traditional ways… Read more »

Grow your Studio, part 2 — In Touch with Students

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Keep in touch with your students.  You could call them your customers, since managing a studio is running a business.  But whether you call them customers, or simply your students, there is one important way to make sure you keep in touch with their needs:  Always keep in mind that behind that email address, that… Read more »

Your studio as employer … or contractor?

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Running a teaching studio is a great service.  Collecting teachers, offering classes and lessons, coordinating schedules, events and policies — it makes total sense to organize it all as efficiently as possible. But it’s important to keep in mind how you decide to organize it all.  There are others who want to know, namely, the… Read more »