Avoiding Burnout with the Conference Experience

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Every March, I attend the Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) Conference to refuel, recharge and reinvigorate my studio and my teaching. After a particularly brutal winter, I found myself frazzled, stressed and on the brink of Teacher Burnout!! Thankfully, I had scheduled time off to attend this year’s conference in the “windy city” of Chicago…. Read more »

Planning a Summer Camp Part 1: A Round-Up of Resources

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I know it’s only March, but I like to take advantage of the time off during spring break to begin planning my studio summer camp so that I can begin advertising in April. (And I can’t exactly advertise unless I know what it IS that I’m advertising.) In years past, I’ve offered camps where I… Read more »

10 Steps to Organize a Masterclass in Your Studio

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In a recent post, The Masterclass: Then and Now, I discussed the purpose and importance of a Masterclass. Masterclasses are an integral part of my studio and I usually hold two or three per studio year. I enjoy the benefits of having my teaching validated by another colleague and it is so helpful for students… Read more »

Thoughts as Music Teachers

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By Julia Kossuth This month, I’ve asked a few of our teachers to comment on what they love the most about teaching. As teachers, we do far more than just instruct kids about the various facets of music, but also love the one-on-one interaction and relationships we get to build with each child. One of… Read more »

Getting Through the Winter Lull

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Is it just me, or do students seriously start lacking some motivation during the winter months? The “newness” of the year has worn off, holiday recitals are behind them, and the end-of-the-year spring recital is too far in the distance to really care much. It’s frustrating for teachers. So how do we as studio owners… Read more »

Group Class Ideas

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By Julia Kossuth One of the opportunities I have at the Studios of Sarah Strout is to teach a group piano class to three 4- and 5-year-olds. Being relatively new to teaching group classes, it’s been a great learning opportunity for me regarding teaching strategies and being creative in class time. A useful tool I’ve… Read more »

Achieve a Good Attitude This Year!

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Several years ago, the following article appeared in our local newspaper. My dad clipped the article and I recently came across it again. It is still timely and valuable advice written by Lloyd Shearer. Shearer was a celebrity columnist for Parade magazine (an insert in the Sunday paper) and wrote the popular column Personality Parade…. Read more »

Studio Field Trip

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Have you ever done a field trip with your studio? I’m attempting one — sort of. Each year, our local symphony holds a children’s symphony — a free, interactive performance that plays lots of kid-friendly songs…and lasts under an hour. While I’m not exactly organizing and transporting the 30 students in my studio to the… Read more »

Is it Talent or Hard Work?

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When a new student starts with me, and they display a bit of natural ability, I get excited. I think, this is going to be fun. It will be really easy to teach them. And sometimes that is true. But sometimes I get a student who is naturally talented and lazy. And they never seem… Read more »

Holiday Fun At Your Studio

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December in the studio can be a stressful time for your students. They are likely busy at home, and some may have end of the semester commitments such as choir/drama performances or school finals. With so much going on, this can be a nice time to take it a bit easier on your students and… Read more »